The 1964 Visual Telephone System From Bell Labs

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60s Skype - the world’s very first “PICTUREPHONE set” unveiled at the World’s Fair, 1964. (From the Bell Telephone Magazine, 1964, via Prelinger Archive)

60s Skype – the world’s very first “PICTUREPHONE set” unveiled at the World’s Fair, 1964. (From the Bell Telephone Magazine, 1964, via Prelinger Archive)

One wonders why such a huge time lag in developing this technology for everyday use.
(via THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW)

Check Out The Earliest Known Officially Licensed 1963 Batmobile

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Earliest Known Officially Licensed 1963 Batmobile

Earliest Known Officially Licensed 1963 Batmobile

1963 Officially Licensed Batmobile, Missing For Decades, Ready To Roar In Upcoming Auction:

Built in 1963, toured in 1966 by DC Comics licensee ALL STAR Dairies and believed to be the earliest custom car in existence, used as an officially licensed Batmobile, one of only two known designs used as real Batmobiles during that era; now restored to full Batman glory and will cross the block at Heritage Auctions Dec. 6.

To read more about this fab car’s wild ride since its creation click here.

Are you Mad About MAD Mag? Issue #1 Is On Auction This Weekend @heritageauction

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For decades nothing has said American satire like MAD magazine. If you’re one of those folks who’s a fan/collector of the mag, and you’ve stashed away that extra change over time hoping to get that elusive first issue, you have a chance this weekend.

Mad #1 (EC, 1952)

Mad #1 (EC, 1952)

Heritage Auctions is offering MAD #1 (EC, 1952) for bids until Sunday, November 16 at 04:00 PM CT. This historic issue features the top story and cover by Harvey Kurtzman. With inside art by Kurtzman, Wally Wood, Jack Davis, John Severin, and Bill Elder ~ Legends All. The go-to collector’s reference, Overstreet 2014, values the comic at $834.00. The current leading bid is $332.60 (with the Buyer’s Premium). So, it looks like someone may have a great chance to get a good deal on this piece of mid-century print history.

Click here to get to the page.

These Collapsible Shades Are 1950s Funtastic

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Unusual Collapsible Sunglasses

The seller of these way cool sunglasses (Vintage Luxury) doesn’t know who designed or manufactured them, and a fairly thorough web search yielded no results. All that is known for sure is that they’re from the 1950s and are very rare and unique.

Not only do they look like wow when worn, they also collapse/fold into rather artistic shapes making for a great conversation piece. These one-of-a-kinders are up for grabs at 1stdibs marketplace. If you have an extra $225 to spare, you can find them here.

They have a kind of retro-sci-fi super hero goggle look.

They have a kind of retro-sci-fi super hero goggle look.

Apart from the design shape they might seem like any other kind of sunglasses. But...

Apart from the design shape they might seem like any other kind of sunglasses. But…

When they are folded, they assume an oddly interesting appearance. Here the sunglasses take on an alien-like look.

When they are folded, they assume an oddly interesting appearance. Here the sunglasses take on an alien-like look.

Just imagine them on a transparent being from another dimension.

Transparent HeadIf you have any info about these please feel free to mention it in the comments.

(Photos via 1stdibs/Vintage Luxury)

Evocative, Bold, And Somewhat Intimidating: The Film Guild Cinema, NYC, 1929

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The Film Guild Cinema, 1929

The Film Guild Cinema, 1929

The Film Guild Cinema, Greenwich Village, NYC, by Frederick Kiesler, 1929

Photo: Ruth Bernhard, 1946

(via: kateopolis)

Imagine How We’d Have To Dress For A Flight Without Pressurized Cabins

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GE electric flying suit for the U.S. Air Corps - 1941

GE electric flying suit for the U.S. Air Corps – 1941

When GE designed this electric flying suit for the U.S. Air Corps, pressurized airplane cabins were not yet in use. At high altitudes, cabins could reach temperatures capable of freezing flesh to metal.

The image above shows a test of a GE electric flying suit at 63 degrees below zero in a cold room at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey in 1941. GIF by Kevin Weir / flux machine.

(via generalelectric)